Arial view of Ohlone land in Oakland, California.

Sogorea Té Land Trust

Oakland, CA

Sogorea Te’ Land Trust is an urban, Indigenous, women-led land trust based in the San Francisco Bay Area that facilitates the return of Indigenous land to Indigenous people. Through the practices of rematriation, cultural revitalization, and land restoration, Sogorea Te’ Land Trust calls on Native and Non-Native peoples to heal and transform the legacies of colonization, genocide, and patriarchy, and to do the work the ancestors and future generations are calling us to do. Sogorea Te’ Land Trust envisions a Bay Area in which Ohlone language and ceremony are an active, thriving part of the cultural landscape, where Ohlone place names and history are known and recognized, and where intertribal Indigenous communities have affordable housing, social services, cultural centers, and land to live, work, and pray on. This work is supported in part by “Shuumi Land Tax,” a voluntary contribution given by guests in the territory to recognize the benefits received from the legacy of colonization.

Sogorea Te’ is centered in Huchuin, the ancestral homeland of Chochenyo-speaking Lisjan Ohlone people, now known as the East Bay.

A map showing traditional Ohlone territory in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Courtesy of Sogorea Té Land Trust
“As we reclaim our land in this urban area, it’s important to understand that we are doing that work as Indigenous people from many tribes, working together to create healing on this land.”
Corrina Gould, Co-Founder/Director

Featured Media

A person holds a sign that says "This Is Ohlone Land."

The Ohlone Are Building a New Homeland in the East Bay, 1 Half-Acre at a Time

The small piece of land deep in East Oakland, just off 105th Avenue and past the raised garden beds of Planting Justice, has for thousands of years been ancestral Ohlone land.
Cover of Bay Nature's Winter 2021 issue

Land Back

Indigenous land repatriation is much discussed and little practiced in the Bay Area. Why is it hard to return stolen land? Corrina Gould believes it would help if more people knew the story of the Ohlone.